In Case You've Wondered

My blog is where my wandering thoughts are interspersed with stuff I made up. So, if while reading you find yourself confused about the context, don't feel alone. I get confused, too.

If you're here for the stories, I started another blog: scratchingforchange.blogspot.com

One other thing: sometimes I write words you refuse to use in front of children, or polite company, unless you have a flat tire, or hit your thumb with a hammer.

I don't use them to offend; I use them to embellish.

jescordwaineratgmail.com

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Repost "The Stars Were Like Diamonds Scattered on Black Velvet"

When I first stepped outside this morning, the Winter constellations were visible in all their glory. I stopped for a moment, and remembered an event from my past. I wrote about it before, so if you read it, read it again. 

Enjoy


It was after midnight, the wind was from the north and the temperature was a little above freezing. A call from the bank let me know we lost 8 million cubic feet of gas and it was my duty to wake someone to go find the problem.

I don't remember who I woke, but I knew before they reached the control room which well was down. The analog meter on 1351-13 was still and I had a pretty good idea it shut in.

The well was a satellite well about a mile from the production platform. It stood alone, without any production equipment, since it was close enough to just pipe to the main platform. We called the boat to go take a look.

Natural gas controls on the platform were simple. Pressure pilots were part of the safety system, which included the pilots and the fire loop. A problem with either would shut the automatic valve and close the well.

It didn't take long to reach the platform. A thorough check revealed no problem, so the gauger felt it was only some moisture in the controls and the well could be put back on line.

I stayed at the platform to slowly turn the manual valve until it was at full pressure. If the CRBBM stayed in the open position, the gauger was right and they would retrieve me when he made the final checks on the main platform.

They left me with a radio. The guager would call, when he was ready for me to start.

Over the next few minutes, the noise from the work boat faded. As they pulled to the main platform, I could barely hear the engines as the boat maneuvered to tie to the structure. When the engines were shut down, the only sounds were the occasional fog horn, the light chop against the structure and the sound of the wind.

There are few experiences in life like the next twenty minutes. I was completely alone, my flashlight provided all the light to be found and the awesome grandeur of a winter night was mine to be enjoyed.

The air was crisp, full of the smell of cold air and found any weakness in my heavy clothes. I pulled my collar up, my sleeves over my gloves and looked up to the stars.

Like myriads of diamond scattered on black velvet, the stars seemed to hang right over my head. Just a simple reach, and I could scrape them from the sky; they'd rain down, like jewels, so I could fill my pockets.

I was awed. Maybe it was the moment, or the splendor of the event, but I was overjoyed with the opportunity. What I observed, and felt, could never be described with words. My soul was touched and nothing could ever describe the feeling.

Eventually, the gauger called, I put the well back on line and the boat returned. I was soon back to the platform and found the gauger was on the way back to the living quarters to finish their interrupted sleep.

The rest of the night passed without any more problems. Soon, I woke the cook; then the crew and had my morning meal. The night was over, but the memory will last forever.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Entertainer Ignorance

Too many entertainers show their ignorance, and spout the current mantra of liberals. What they don't realize is that it not only hurts them, it hurts their industry, and many not only don't want to be entertained any longer, they want the industry to be punished financially by low revenue.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

It's What I'm Used To

September brings different days. It will be hot, but the humidity will be lower. Nights bring temperatures just above 70 degrees, which is a lower temperature than the setting on most air conditioners.

The clouds are different. Where Summer brought towering cumulus clouds, early Fall brings thin stratus, that offer moments of cool, while they shade for a few moments.

Most of all, it's obvious the weather is changing. Soon, a front will bring temperatures much lower, and the fog. The frontal passage will bring brilliant blue skies, and clear nights, but soon, the fog will form in the night, and driving will be hazardous.

We're at the last of our constant vigil for hurricanes. Fronts push them away, and the apprehension finally leaves. This year was bad, but many are not. It's a good thing to not have any dangerous weather, and it allows moments of peace as the seasons change.

Friday, September 15, 2017

Pfffft!

Several large corporations receive billions in federal subsidies, and only give a few hundred thousands each to the Red Cross, which uses the lions share of the money to pay exorbitant salaries, advertise on national networks, and purchase expensive real estate.

Meanwhile, people that paid taxes their entire lives are struggling to survive, and wondering if they will. I hope they reflect their dissatisfaction by avoiding boiler house charities, and the products of corporate welfare companies. Their tax dollars may be abused, but they still control what they have left on pay day.

Pfffft!

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Something I've Observed

With all the flooding, water marks are noticeable on the homes. Usually, there's a line of debris, but some marks are discoloration from the water.

One thing I've observed is the height of the marks correspond to the local road, or local freshwater canal, or highway. Otherwise, the drainage was impeded enough to allow the water to build to level where it finally spills over the obstruction.

I'm wondering if anyone affected noticed this too, and the crapstorm will soon start. Losing a house to natural causes is one thing; losing it because the engineering of certain things neglected to consider 200 year flood events is another.