In Case You've Wondered

My blog is where my wandering thoughts are interspersed with stuff I made up. So, if while reading you find yourself confused about the context, don't feel alone. I get confused, too.

If you're here for the stories, they can be found by clicking the labels button "stuff I made up".

One other thing: sometimes I write words you refuse to use in front of children, or polite company, unless you have a flat tire, or hit your thumb with a hammer.

I don't use them to offend; I use them to embellish.

jescordwaineratgmail.com

Monday, November 19, 2012

My Health, Retirement and Irony

The government is going out of its way to make sure I stay healthy and live for a long time. I guess this is good, but it's also ironic they're going out of their way to make sure I don't have any retirement resources until I'm much older. Otherwise, they want me to live a long time, pay a lot of money towards retirement and not get any of the benefits.

I have a solution to what appears as wasted money. How about we just come up with an age that is the final age we live? Say 75 years old. If you go before that, so be it. If not, you have a big party, everybody says goodbye and you get a shot that lets you peacefully pass on.

Now, this plan would be good, except it should only apply to members of the private sector. Bureaucrats and politicians would go at 40, which I consider a generous effort on my part, since it's 2 1/2 years past the halfway point of the private sector. They produce absolutely nothing and demand what I consider an exorbitant amount of my labor to satisfy their destructive agenda. Giving them more than half a life is more than generous.

I know you're wondering how this applies to the military. The solution is simple. If the military member is a combat officer, they get the 75 year cutoff. Those that are bureaucratic paper pushers, or only have an administrative position, they get the 40 year cutoff.

How about the local and state public sector? Those that serve a function that actually has a real meaning, such as repair crews, get the 75 year cutoff. Those that only exist to create, or push another piece of paper go at 40.

Of course, my solution would have to be retroactive. Otherwise, if agreed upon, those bureaucrats and politicians beyond the age of 40 would have to go immediately. It's nothing personal, and best. They're way past the point of doing anything even close to productive, and their retirement burdens need to be lowered through attrition. I know we'll have to help their survivors, but in the future, nobody that is basically useless will ever reach the retirement age. Think of the money saved and how many double dippers would never be allowed the cushy pensions that the private sector never receives.

Are you thinking: "How will our country ever survive without all those politicians and bureaucrats?" If so, the answer is: Not only would it survive, it would flourish and I doubt seriously there would be many people that would aspire to be a politician or bureaucrat. That's a good thing. After all, they're just warts on the ass of progress anyway.

I know some reading may be, or have a family member past the age of 75. Anyone 45, or older, gets a fifty year grace period to decide whether they want to protest the rule, or not....as long as they're not a politician or a bureaucrat.


4 comments:

  1. Paper pushers are not, and never have been, the ones who produce the product. Electricity, infrastructure, water, food....

    If the working class would revolt and riot, what paperpusher could survive?

    The only true solution would be if ALL politicians worked for a salary where social security is their only payoff, and their medical care is the same as for the rest of us. THEN they'd take care of the workers.

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    1. If the working class revolted, the paper-pushers would be the first casualties.

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  2. Your plan is also environmentally friendly - just think of how many resources would be saved, lights not turned on, GSA cars not driven - the mind boggles.

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    1. My mind does boggle. The number of trees saved from being cut to use for paper that is totally useless would fill several huge forests.

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