In Case You've Wondered

My blog is where my wandering thoughts are interspersed with stuff I made up. So, if while reading you find yourself confused about the context, don't feel alone. I get confused, too.

If you're here for the stories, I started another blog: scratchingforchange.blogspot.com

One other thing: sometimes I write words you refuse to use in front of children, or polite company, unless you have a flat tire, or hit your thumb with a hammer.

I don't use them to offend; I use them to embellish.

jescordwaineratgmail.com

Monday, January 17, 2022

The Four Weeks are Over

I had a ganglion cyst removed from my wrist four weeks ago. It was a simple surgery, which is probably never really simple. The surgery was removing the cyst, suturing the tendon that was leaking, and four weeks of wearing an arm brace. The arm brace was the hard part, since it is really a pain in the butt, but much better than a cast. At least I could remove it while showering. I tried a bath, but getting out of the tub was pretty much a lesson in futility using only one hand. Cautions about the glue they used mandated never submerging the wound in water. Flopping around the bathtub proved it was a strong possibility.

On my two week follow up, I asked the doctor if there was any chance of the cyst reappearing. He said if I follow his directions, it's less than one percent. That, and unless I had any problems, that was my last visit, and in two weeks, I could remove the wrist brace. 

So today was the day. I realized much of my movements were dictated by the brace, and found I was still trying to navigate the use of the arm as though the brace was still there. I did find some movements cause a sharp pain. I figure that's a little due to atrophy, and the need to slowly start using the hand again. Time will tell, but it's good to have the large, painful lump off my wrist. I reached the point I couldn't ignore it, and putting the surgery off was just procrastination.

The doctor that performed the surgery performed my two carpal tunnel releases. After those episodes, choosing a doctor for the surgery was a simple task. It's good to have a doctor you trust, and the fact he didn't seem the least bit concerned about Covid only made it better.

9 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Forty years ago, I would have never guessed I would now be dealing with lumps, bumps and skin problems. I'm blessed to have the ability to take care of them.

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  2. Man, I know whereof ye speak! I had a cyst on my middle finger, middle knuckle, dominate hand. Doc cut it off, did the work, and splinted it. It was a real outpatient surgery with the gown and general anesthesia. Everyone needs a paycheck I guess.

    When he pulled out the stitches he just grabbed an end and ripped it out. I about punched him. He said to move it and be ready for a "release". I'd read about the tendon getting sticky, then popping loose. It happened to me, too. I can't really explain the feeling. Like I popped the tendon in half, then THE MOST INSTANTLY GRATIFYING FEELING I've ever felt in my head and hands. Very strange. Like what I'd imagine a first hit of dope feels like to an addict. Very weird.

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    1. Mine never felt like it was released, although it sometimes ached. Now, it's not sore, but all the muscles I wasn't using due to the brace ache. That should go away, and things go back to normal.

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  3. Hopefully, you are done with surgeries for a while.

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    1. I have one, but not soon. Repairing my hiatal hernia will eliminate the medication for GERD. That, and it's time for a colonoscopy. The procedure is a walk in the park. The prep is a night on the toilet.

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  4. Well, that sounds like great news!

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    1. It is. If I'd known the long term effects of all the years I finished concrete, I might have never let employers know I could.

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